Category: Carbon Price

Stop saying yes: The Greens

This is the sixth in a series of posts about the Australian climate movement. I am not at all happy with the Australian climate movement, but I have fewer complaints about the Australian Greens party. The Greens deserve credit for being the only Australian parliamentary political force which has made a positive contribution to climate …

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Stop saying yes: What went wrong?

This is the third in a series of posts about the Australian climate movement. In 2011, Australian climate activists united under the lowest-common-denominator “Say Yes” campaign. The focus was, above all, on supporting a carbon price, apparently any carbon price that might be negotiated by the Multi-Party Climate Change Committee (MPCCC). (See the previous posts …

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Stop saying yes: A not-so-clean energy future

This is the second in a series of posts about the Australian climate movement. The Clean Energy Future policy negotiated by the Multi-Party Climate Change Committee falls far short of what is required, and is riddled with flaws. The $23 carbon tax in isolation will not drive the transition to a zero-carbon economy. The true …

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It’s time to stop saying yes

This is the first in a series of posts about the Australian climate movement. The Australian climate change action movement (which I will call the “climate movement”) has, in recent years, made an error of strategy. In the hope of winning a victory, however small, activists have become extremely pragmatic and “politically realistic”. This culminated …

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Don’t mention the warming

The Gillard Labor Government’s stupidity has reached a new low. They have released a new set of climate change ads… which fail to mention climate change. Instead they tell us about the Government’s “Household Assistance Package”: Assistance for what, you could be forgiven for asking? You wouldn’t know it, but in fact the ad is …

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Climate ignored in Australian federal budget

“Global warming poses a clear and present danger to civilization.” – US paleoclimatologist Lonnie Thompson “Madam Deputy Speaker, in coming years no first?world, first?rate economy will succeed without cleaner sources of energy. So part of the broader transformation of our economy involves moving to a clean energy future, and helping Australian businesses and households make …

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Labor should ignore business lobby’s whining

Yesterday, ABC Breakfast host Fran Kelly berated Climate Change Minister Greg Combet for not accepting the ridiculous complaint by business that Australia’s carbon price is somehow “too high”. This is the fossil fuel lobby’s latest excuse, an argument they have been making for months now. Credit where it’s due: I am pleased to say Labor …

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Rudd’s political tantrum must be opposed

Yesterday in Australia, a politician I once believed in, Kevin Rudd, challenged our Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, for the leadership of the Australian Labor Party. I responded by doing something I never thought I would do: I emailed every Labor MP and Senator urging them to oppose Rudd’s attempt to regain the Prime Ministership. Although …

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Clean Energy Bill only the beginning

Today the Australian Parliament passed the Multi-Party Climate Change Committee’s Clean Energy Bill. Despite my reservations about the bill, I am pleased to see it finally made law. It is also satisfying to see the Liberal-National Coalition defeated (at least for now) in their crusade against climate action. However, the work of the climate movement …

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Top 10 Flaws in Government’s “Clean Energy Future”

Yesterday the Australian House of Representatives passed the Clean Energy Future legislation, but it doesn’t feel like much of a victory. A carbon price is a first step in Australia’s necessary transition away from its current fossil fuel economy toward the renewable energy one of the future. The Clean Energy Future includes significant improvements on …

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